Cincinnati woman beats cancer twice, giving back in the process

A woman from Cincinnati has now beaten cancer twice and celebrated Tuesday morning with a shoutout on national television. Kila Tripp is now a two-time cancer survivor. The young woman from Terrace Park announced the news on Tuesday TODAY, saying at the opening of the show, “I celebrate beating cancer twice. Cheers to today!” Tripp was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia twice – and beaten twice. Tripp was diagnosed as a freshman in high school at age 14 and was treated at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital for two and a half years. In 2019, she found out that her cancer had returned, which inspired her to act instead of feeling defeated in an interview last year. Tripp ran a “Fund the Cure Next Door” campaign that raised more than $ 75,000 a second time for childhood cancer research at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, one of the best for child cancer care in the country. “She’s one of those people who, no matter how sick she is, the first question that comes out of her mouth, with attention: ‘How are you?'” Said her mother Cindy. “Life is not about waiting for it that the storm is passing by, but about learning to dance in the rain, and I accept this quote and so I decided to live my life, “said Kila.

A woman from Cincinnati has now beaten cancer twice and celebrated Tuesday morning with a shoutout on national television.

Kila Tripp is now a two-time cancer survivor.

The young woman from Terrace Park announced the news on Tuesday TODAY, saying at the opening of the show, “I’m celebrating beating cancer twice. Cheers to today!”

Tripp was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia twice – and twice defeated.

Tripp was diagnosed as a freshman in high school at age 14 and was treated at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital for two and a half years.

In 2019, she found out that her cancer had returned, which inspired her to act instead of feeling defeated.

“I haven’t put my life on hold during that time, I want to go on while I’m fighting for my life,” Kila told us in an interview last year.

Tripp ran a “Fund the Cure Next Door” campaign that raised more than $ 75,000 for childhood cancer research at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, one of the best for child cancer care in the country.

She did all of this while battling cancer for the second time.

“She’s one of those people who, no matter how sick she is, the first question that comes out of her mouth is, with attention, ‘How are you?'” Said her mother, Cindy.

Kila said the silver lining is what she focuses on.

“Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, it is about learning to dance in the rain and I accept that quote and so I made the decision to live my life,” said Kila.

By ayunda